Weekly News: Shannon Szabados, Kendra Broad, and more

“The biggest thing that we’re looking for, what Dani (Rylan, league founder and commissioner) likes to say is: ‘we want to have 72 stars in this league,’” said the representative. “We want to have every player in this league be a big deal. The best way to do that is for everybody to know them and care about them and have information on them.”

“I knew I had to come here (to Western) to finish my fifth year of eligibility,” she said. Not that it was easy to walk away from the prospect of going pro. “Even though it’s not a lot of money… it was kind of hard to turn that down,” she said.

On top of the talented draft class, Jordanna Peroff, who was acquired Friday from Toronto where she won the 2014 Clarkson Cup, was back with several McGill teammates including Charline Labonte, team captain Cathy Chartrand, Ann-Sophie Bettez, Carly Hill, and others.

“As a team, we need to become stronger defensively and offer our goaltenders more support,” said General Manager, Rebecca Michael. “Up front, we need to start producing more throughout all four lines and not solely depending on our top players.”

“I’m pretty confident either way I’ll get a good amount of ice time, but definitely I’d like to play a little bit of a bigger role this year with a year of experience,” Szabados told The Canadian Press. “I’m a lot more confident going into this season with how I played last year.”

The Beauts don’t have as much veteran experience as the other NWHL teams, but look for the team to develop into one of the fastest and possibly one of the highest-scoring teams in the league.

  • Need to find a NWHL team to cheer for? Taylor Clark is running a series previewing each NWHL team and their facilities over on Along the Boards. So far she’s done the Buffalo Beauts and the Boston Pride.

Shannon Szabados: Never Just Another Player

I had my notes from sitting down with two-time Olympic gold medalist and Canadian goaltender Shannon Szabados up on my laptop for more than a week. Every day I’d open them up and stare without any story materializing and I started to despair that this story would ever see the light of day.

I’m used to taking interviews and turning them into straight profiles the way I was taught in school. But when the story I thought I was going to write just wasn’t coming together, I realized it’s ok to break the rules a little. After all, this started off as a profile of a woman who’s done nothing but challenge standards and rules her whole career.

So instead, I want to use my conversation with Shannon to open a larger dialogue about breaking ground, role models, scrutiny and attention.

Continue reading Shannon Szabados: Never Just Another Player

Shannon Szabados Practices With Edmonton Oilers; Everyone’s Got An Opinion

Two days ago, the Edmonton Oilers traded for Fasth, and people immediately began speculating about whether he’d be able to make it from Anaheim to Edmonton in time. This isn’t the first time the Oilers have been in a situation like this, and last time, fans clamored for hometown player Shannon Szabados to get the call. That didn’t happen, and at the time, she voiced disappointment. Two nights ago, Oilers fans got #SzabadosForBackup trending – and yesterday, she practiced with the Oilers. Awesome? Probably! A stunt? Almost definitely. So we’re gonna break it down a bit.

Continue reading Shannon Szabados Practices With Edmonton Oilers; Everyone’s Got An Opinion

Mid-Week Link Round Up: Still mostly people being upset about women’s hockey.

I know, I know, very surprising.

  • The Pink Puck did an article about what Noora Räty’s retirement from women’s hockey means for the sport. Now, either you’ve already read this, because it’s been linked from hell and back again, or you skipped it because you went “oh, another annoying article that will either enrage me or make me otherwise upset.If you’re in the later category like I was, I’d encourage you to give it a shot and read it. It’s probably not going to have anything new per se in it, but it does have an attitude I find generally lacking around discussions like this, and that is that women’s hockey is not men’s hockey and shouldn’t ever have to be.Look, I’ve done it too, I’ve joked about how the Wild should get Räty a try-out, because after all we have A Goalie Situation and we love our Gophers– but that doesn’t solve the actual issue, which is that women shouldn’t have to play in men’s leagues to be respected as good players.
  • The Globe and Mail did a profile piece about Shannon Szabados and Carey Price, the starting goaltenders for the Canadian women’s team and the Canadian men’s team respectively, and how they both started out as teenagers trying out for the WHL’s Tri-City Americans. It’s not a rare story, but it had some background I hadn’t heard before, including the following from Bob Tory, the Tri-City GM who was responsible for her WHL tryout.

“I’ve had players on my team, boys, named Shannon, so I didn’t know I was watching a girl – and she was outstanding,” Tory recalled. “It was only after the game, when she got selected game star, I knew it was a girl.

  • You’ve probably seen this, because it EXPLODED across Twitter, but the IIHF President Rene Fesel has said women’s hockey will never be removed from the Olympics. Probably won’t shut people up from arguing it should or shouldn’t be, but yanno, that’s the joy of the internet.
  • Clare over at the Puckologist talked about women as invisible sports fans. That’s not just an issue in men’s sports, like the NHL, but is, as Clare points out, generally the first stumbling block to discussing seriously how to market women’s sports.
  • I haven’t seen this anywhere else that’s not sourcing off this, which could be a language barrier thing, or could be something else, but apparently the Finnish National team’s head coach, Mika Pieniniemi, is retiring after just one year in the position. The rest of the recap of the Finland/Russia game is interesting on its own, but what I found interesting was the quote from the Russian head coach, Mikhail Chekhanov, who said:

    “I’m not sure whether it was a back forward or backward, but at least we managed to reshape the team so it can play offensively. We did a step for the future, and we managed to close the gap against teams like Finland and Sweden.”

    I found this interesting because Russia has been the team that, so far, has had the best Corsi besides Canada and the US. We’ve got some plans to run the numbers after the Olympics, see what pops out with more data and analysis and ideally having run some numbers from Worlds, but that in itself is interesting. (How many more times can I say “interesting”, WHO KNOWS)